Republicans Won More Seats, Democrats Won More Votes

The 435 House elections produced the anomalous result of Republicans winning more seats and Democrats winning more votes. Photograph by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Democrats failed to regain control of the U.S. House of Representatives even though they won 1 million more votes than Republicans.

The number of states backing Senate and presidential candidates of the same party grew to the largest in at least 60 years.

And President Barack Obama made history by losing every county in West Virginia.

These are among the findings in data compiled by Bloomberg on the 2012 election results, which call attention to an electorate that is increasingly polarized and two major parties that are as ideologically distinct as ever.

“It confirms that the trend toward increased party-line voting observed over the past couple of decades continues,” said Gary Jacobson, a political scientist at the University of California at San Diego. “The party coalitions are increasingly ideologically coherent and differentiated from one another, producing higher party loyalty and less ticket-splitting.”

The 435 House elections produced the anomalous result of Republicans winning more seats and Democrats winning more votes.

Democrats led Republicans by 56 million to 55 million votes nationally, according to unofficial tallies from the Associated Press.

It’s the first time since 1996 that one party won more House seats while winning fewer votes, according to data compiled by the House Clerk’s office. The outcome is the product in part of Republican-dominated redrawing of House seat boundaries after the 2010 Census and of population shifts.

See the full report at Bloomberg.com.

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