EPA’s Jackson Leaving in January

Photograph by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Under Lisa Jackson, the EPA negotiated fuel-efficiency standards with automakers and set the first-ever rules for mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants

Lisa Jackson, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, is leaving in January.

The EPA director’s four-year tenure has been marked by controversy over regulation of matters such as the Keystone pipeline.

President Barack Obama suggested today that Jackson’s tenure also has been marked by “sensible and important steps to protect the air we breathe and the water we drink.”

That includes “implementing the first national standard for harmful mercury pollution, taking important action to combat climate change under the Clean Air Act, and playing a key role in establishing historic fuel economy standards that will save the average American family thousands of dollars at the pump, while also slashing carbon pollution,,” Obama said in a statement released by the White House.

“I will leave the EPA confident the ship is sailing in the right direction,” Jackson, 50, said today in a statement released by the agency. Her plan is to leave after the president’s State of the Union speech next month.

Under Jackson, the EPA negotiated fuel-efficiency standards with automakers and set the first-ever rules for mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants.

 Jim Snyder and Mark Drajem contributed.

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