Rove as Kingmaker Rejected by Republicans Seeking Better Returns

Photograph by David Goldman/AP Photo

Karl Rove, former Senior Advisor and Deputy Chief of Staff to former President George W. Bush, left, talks to Sen. Orrin Hatch, on the floor of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 27, 2012.

For more than a decade, Republicans have looked to Karl Rove for the solution.

Now, a growing number see him as the problem.

Rove, 62, has put his imprimatur and donor money behind the Conservative Victory Project, formed to choose more electable Republican candidates and avoid such defeats as those of Todd Akin in Missouri and Richard Mourdock in Indiana, two races the party was banking on winning as part of expanding its U.S. Senate caucus.

That has drawn fire from numerous party activists, former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and even businessman Donald Trump, all of whom say Rove shouldn’t try to play kingmaker.

“I am unalterably opposed to a bunch of billionaires financing a boss to pick candidates in 50 states,” Gingrich wrote in a Human Events article published yesterday. “No one person is smart enough nor do they have the moral right to buy nominations across the country,” added Gingrich, whose 2012 bid for the Republican presidential nomination was aided by $21.5 million in donations from casino mogul Sheldon Adelson and his family to a friendly super-political action committee.

The fight between Rove and other Republican officials and activists is a proxy for the larger issues the party faces as its traditional apparatus wanes in campaigns dominated by independent groups and big-dollar donors.

See the full report on Rove at Bloomberg.com.

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