Bloomberg by the Numbers: 17

An armed man in military fatigues holds a machine gun colored by a flag of self-named 'People's Republic of Donetsk' as he stands guard outside the security service regional building seized by the separatists in the eastern Ukrainian city of Slavyansk on April 28, 2014.

Photograph by Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

An armed man in military fatigues holds a machine gun colored by a flag of self-named ‘People’s Republic of Donetsk’ as he stands guard outside the security service regional building seized by the separatists in the eastern Ukrainian city of Slavyansk on April 28, 2014.

By a 17-point margin, Americans support increased economic and diplomatic sanctions against Russia.

By 53-36 percentage points.

At the same time, 62 percent oppose and 30 percent support sending arms and military supplies to the Ukrainian government, according to a Pew Research Center/USA Today survey.

The survey of 1,501 adults was conducted from April 23-27, before President Barack Obama’s administration imposed sanctions yesterday on seven Russian officials and 17 companies close to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

“The U.S. and EU say Russia hasn’t lived up to an accord signed April 17 in Geneva intended to defuse the confrontation between the Ukrainian government and pro-Russian separatists,” Bloomberg’s Roger Runningen and Jonathan Allen reported. “The U.S. warned it’s prepared to levy additional penalties to hit the broader Russian economy if Putin escalates by sending troops into Ukraine.”

About equal majorities of Democrats and Republicans back enhanced sanctions, though there’s a big partisan gap in how they view Obama’s handling of U.S. policy in the Russia-Ukraine crisis generally, the Pew survey found.

Increased sanctions draw more support from men, older Americans, college graduates and upper-income earners than other demographic subgroups, according to the report.

Obama administration officials “acknowledged they don’t expect an immediate change in Putin’s behavior from the new sanctions,” Bloomberg’s Indira A.R. Lakshmanan, Ilya Arkhipov and Kasia Klimasinska reported.

“One senior official said the administration’s goal is to steadily show Russia that there is going to be much more severe economic pain and political isolation, and that Russia stands to lose far more by continuing its actions in Ukraine over time,” they wrote.

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