Bloomberg by the Numbers: 31, 47

U.S. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden meets with House Democratic leaders in the Oval Office on Oct. 15, 2013 in Washington, DC.

Photograph by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden meets with House Democratic leaders in the Oval Office on Oct. 15, 2013 in Washington, DC.

About 31 percent of Democratic voters say they think of their vote in the November election as one “for” President Barack Obama, compared with 47 percent of Democrats who said that in February 2010.

“At this early point in the campaign, Obama inspires far less enthusiasm among Democratic voters than he did four years ago,” according to a report from the Pew Research Center, which conducted a survey April 23-27.

“Democratic voters’ lack of enthusiasm for Obama may complicate Democrats’ turnout efforts,” according to the report released yesterday.

Obama has called attention to the drop-off in the Democratic vote between presidential elections and midterm elections. “In midterms we get clobbered,” the president said at a Democratic fundraiser in March, a reference to the 2010 election in which Republicans won a House majority after making a net gain of 63 House seats.

Democrats are laboring to hold their majority in the Senate, where they’re the defending party in 21 of 36 races, including seven in states that Obama didn’t win in the 2012 election. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, the campaign arm of the 55-Democrat Senate majority, is shifting tens of millions of dollars to a get-out-the-vote campaign in key states.

Republicans have an edge in the midterm election even as the party has a poor public image. By 68 percent to 23 percent, more voters disapprove than approve of Republican leaders in Congress. The numbers weren’t much better for Democratic leaders in Congress, with 60 percent of voters approving and 32 percent disapproving.

Click here for the Pew report.

 

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