Chamber Backs Gov’t-Shutdown Republicans in TV Ads

National Park Service park ranger Richard Trott removes a closed sign at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 17, 2013 after the government shutdown.

Photograph by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

National Park Service park ranger Richard Trott removes a closed sign at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 17, 2013 after the government shutdown.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the largest business lobby, is out today with ads in two Senate and 11 House races, all on behalf of Republicans –including support for Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky in his effort to stave off a Tea Party-fueled primary challenge.

“This campaign is focused on issues critical to reestablishing economic growth and on behalf of candidates who are prepared to help lead the American recovery,” said Blair Latoff Holmes, a Chamber spokeswoman.

The incumbents backed in this latest round of ads took actions that shut down the government in October over the objections of the Chamber and 250 other organizations.

“It is not in the best interest of the employers, employees or the American people to risk a government shutdown that will be economically disruptive and create even more uncertainties for the U.S. economy,” the Chamber and the other groups wrote in September.

Rep. Cory Gardner of Colorado, now seeking the Senate seat held by Democrat Mark Udall, Reps. David Valadao of California, Mike Coffman of Colorado, Mike Simpson of Idaho, Andy Barr of Kentucky, Dan Benishek of Michigan, Joe Heck of Nevada and Chris Gibson of New York all refused to pass a spending bill to keep the government open without also delaying or eilminating funding for the Affordable Care Act, which will expand health-care coverage to millions of Americans.

That assured that the government would be forced to shut down as there was no support for cutting off funding for the health-care law in the Democratic-controlled Senate.

The chamber’s other backed candidates in this latest round of ads, Doug Ose of California, Bob Dold of Illinois, Richard Tisei of Massachusetts and Stewart Mills of Minnesota, are all running against Democrats who supported keeping the government open.

 

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