IRS Spent $14 Million Complying with Congressional Inquiry

Seasonal worker Steven Flagg, in a Statue of Liberty costume, three days before the April 15 tax deadline.

Photograph by Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Seasonal worker Steven Flagg, in a Statue of Liberty costume, three days before the April 15 tax deadline.

Congress spent a lot of time investigating the Internal Revenue Service  last year.

And now there’s statistical proof.

Congressional committees received 10.6 billion disclosures of taxpayer information last year, up from 2.4 billion the year before, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation’s annual report.

The IRS has said it spent $14 million complying with congressional inquiries 
stemming from the agency’s disclosure that it gave extra scrutiny to Tea Party groups applying for tax-exempt status.

Investigators and the IRS have had repeated clashes during the past year over whether the agency is moving quickly enough to release information.

Congressional tax-writing committees are authorized to receive taxpayer-specific information. The big IRS cost comes in redacting such information for other committees.

 

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