Bloomberg by the Numbers: 303

Attendees listen as Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor, speaks during a virtual conversation at the South By Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin on March 10, 2014.

Photograph by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

Attendees listen as Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor, speaks during a virtual conversation at the South By Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin on March 10, 2014.

The House yesterday, with a 303-121 vote, passed a bill that would restrict some National Security Agency powers to collect data in bulk.

The bill, H.R. 3361, “would end one of the most controversial domestic spy programs under which the NSA collects and stores as much as five years of phone records on Americans,” Bloomberg’s Chris Strohm and Derek Wallbank reported. “The bill arrives almost one year after the spying was exposed in documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.”

The measure would “impose a number of reporting and transparency requirements regarding the use of surveillance and would extend three expiring intelligence-gathering authorities through Dec. 31, 2017,” Bloomberg Government’s Adam Schank and Tiffany Young wrote in a BGOV bill summary.

The legislation goes next to the Senate. President Barack Obama would sign the bill into law, according to a statement of administration policy that said the bill “ensures our intelligence and law enforcement professionals have the authorities they need to protect the Nation, while further ensuring that individuals’ privacy is appropriately protected when these authorities are employed.”

Republicans voted 179 to 51 in favor of the bill and Democrats backed it by 124 to 70.

 

 

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