Bloomberg by the Numbers: 2

U.S. Rep. John Dingell (D-MI) (3rd L), Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (L), and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (2nd L) after the unveiling of a portrait of Dingell during a celebration recognizing him as the longest-serving member in the history of the United States Congress on June 13, 2013 at the Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

Photograph by Alex Wong/Getty Images

U.S. Rep. John Dingell (D-MI) (3rd L), Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (L), and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (2nd L) after the unveiling of a portrait of Dingell during a celebration recognizing him as the longest-serving member in the history of the United States Congress on June 13, 2013 at the Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

There are two military veterans of World War II in Congress.

One is Michigan Democrat John Dingell, the longest-serving member of Congress in its history. Dingell, 87, served in the Army from 1944 to 1946 and was first elected to the House in 1955, succeeding his namesake father after his death.

Dingell isn’t seeking re-election this year and probably will be succeeded by his wife Debbie Dingell, who’s well-known in Democratic political circles and in the Michigan business community.

The other World War II veteran in Congress is Texas Republican Ralph Hall, 91, who served in the Navy and was first elected to the House in 1980 as a conservative Democrat.

Hall, who became a Republican in 2004, is laboring to hold on to his seat in a runoff election today. Opponent John Ratcliffe, a former federal prosecutor, has called attention to Hall’s age; the incumbent is the oldest House member in history.

There are no World War II veterans left in the Senate. The last was New Jersey Democrat Frank Lautenberg, who died last year.

 

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