Bloomberg by the Numbers: 24.6%

Emissions at the coal fired Morgantown Generating Station, on May 29, 2014 in Newburg, Maryland.

Photograph by Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Emissions at the coal fired Morgantown Generating Station, on May 29, 2014 in Newburg, Maryland.

The Environmental Protection Agency announced a new pollution-cutting rule Monday with enough facts and figures to bury anyone beneath numerical rubble for weeks on end.  In the avalanche, the most relevant figure to remember may be 24.6 percent.

The regulation, which is not due to be finalized for another year, is most often expressed as a 30-percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by the year 2030,

But there are plenty of other numbers that are just as useful. They range from different ways of calculating the actual cut in carbon emissions to calculations of the benefits and costs of the proposed rule to the value of certain health afflictions associated with carbon dioxide pollution. Here’s a look at the EPA rule by the numbers:

30% — That’s the big, round number the White House and EPA are using to promote the rule as a major victory for environmental protection and public health. How do they get that big a number? It is measured against the level of carbon dioxide emitted in 2005, one of the highest years on record.

15% — The reduction in CO2 emissions already achieved since the administration’s baseline year of 2005.

17% — The CO2 cut required by 2030 as compared with current levels.

24.6% — The CO2 cut required of states in 2030 compared with the level that EPA estimates would be emitted that year without the new rule. For some, this is the most apples-to-apples comparison of what the rule requires.

$55 billion to $93 billion — The value of the economic and public health benefits that the EPA says will accrue to the American public in 2030 under the new rule.

$43 billion to $74 billion — The net value of the economic and public health benefits President Barack Obama told members of Congress would be reaped by the rule in the year 2025. The EPA also noted this net range — after costs are taken into account — in the materials it released on Monday.

$7.3 billion to $8.8 billion — The annual cost of complying with the rule in 2030, according to EPA.

$200,000 — The value the EPA assigns to a person between the ages of 55 and 64 avoiding a non-fatal heart attack in the year 2020.

$98,000 — The value the EPA assigns to a person under the age of 25 or over the age of 64 avoiding a non-fatal heart attack in the year 2020.

$480 — The amount the EPA figures a person would pay to avoid six days of acute bronchitis in 2020.

$16 — The EPA’s calculation of the average amount a person would pay in 2020 to avoid having his or her eyes irritated.

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