Bloomberg by the Numbers: 45, 37

The Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, on Aug. 30, 2012.

Photograph by Scott Eells/Bloomberg

The Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, on Aug. 30, 2012.

 Forty-five percent of registered voters who say they plan to vote Republican for Congress in the Nov. 4 election say they’re more enthusiastic about voting than in previous congressional elections, compared with 37 percent of Democratic backers, according to the Pew Research Center.
The data point to an “enthusiasm gap” between the two parties ahead of the Nov. 4 election, in which Republicans are seeking to defend their House majority and capture a Senate majority at the midpoint of President Barack Obama’s second term. The White House’s party usually loses ground in Congress in midterm elections, when the opposition party’s voters want to send the incumbent administration a message.
The Republican enthusiasm advantage is smaller than its advantage in 2010, when Republicans made a net gain of 63 House seats and gained ground in the Senate, or the Democratic edge in 2006, when that party won majorities in both chambers amid public disapproval of President George W. Bush and his prosecution of the U.S. war in Iraq.
“The GOP had a 13-point enthusiasm advantage at this point in the midterm campaign four years ago (55% to 42%) and the Democrats held a 17-point advantage eight years ago (47% to 30%),” according to the report.

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